In a market full of uncertainty, it is the entrepreneur who can actually help clear up uncertainty, as he makes judgments or assumes the risk. To the extent that capitalism is a dynamic profit-and-loss system, entrepreneurs drive efficient discovery and consistently reveal knowledge. Established firms face increased competition and challenges from entrepreneurs, which often spurs them toward research and development efforts as well. In technical economic terms, the entrepreneur disrupts course toward steady-state equilibrium.
Core values- Values such as integrity, honesty and the pursuit of professional excellence are a reflection of an individual's self image, created by their religious beliefs, their family experience and life lessons. We have found that people with similar values work well together, work harder, teach each other, hold each other accountable and deliver a work product that serves the client well.
"There are more entrepreneurs than investors on the Forbes list of wealthiest people, but that doesn't mean entrepreneurship is necessarily a better wealth builder than investing. There's a selection bias in that entrepreneurs have much more concentrated asset allocation, often having nearly all of their net worth tied up in their own company (and usually not able to sell it very quickly), whereas investors are more diversified. Also, for every entrepreneur who strikes it big there are many others who completely fail, so the list is not a good guide to where the most wealth is being created."
Theorists Frank Knight[80] and Peter Drucker defined entrepreneurship in terms of risk-taking. The entrepreneur is willing to put his or her career and financial security on the line and take risks in the name of an idea, spending time as well as capital on an uncertain venture. However, entrepreneurs often do not believe that they have taken an enormous amount of risks because they do not perceive the level of uncertainty to be as high as other people do. Knight classified three types of uncertainty:
At least early on, entrepreneurs often "bootstrap-finance"[135] their start-up rather than seeking external investors from the start. One of the reasons that some entrepreneurs prefer to "bootstrap" is that obtaining equity financing requires the entrepreneur to provide ownership shares to the investors. If the start-up becomes successful later on, these early equity financing deals could provide a windfall for the investors and a huge loss for the entrepreneur. If investors have a significant stake in the company, they may as well be able to exert influence on company strategy, chief executive officer (CEO) choice and other important decisions. This is often problematic since the investor and the founder might have different incentives regarding the long-term goal of the company. An investor will generally aim for a profitable exit and therefore promotes a high-valuation sale of the company or IPO in order to sell their shares. Whereas the entrepreneur might have philanthropic intentions as their main driving force. Soft values like this might not go well with the short-term pressure on yearly and quarterly profits that publicly traded companies often experience from their owners.

"Entrepreneurs and business owners definitely need to get used to taking risks … You have to get comfortable being uncomfortable. Trying to grow a company or execute on an idea is difficult. It's not always going to be roses and unicorns. At some point, you're going to run into issues, lose customers and have financial constraints. It's at this point you need to get back on the horse and take another risk, whether it's in the form of a new product, new marketing campaign or a new customer recruitment strategy." – Mathew Ross, co-founder and COO of Slumber Yard
Three thinkers were central to the inclusion of entrepreneurs: Joseph Schumpeter, Frank Knight, and Israel Kirzner. Schumpeter suggested that entrepreneurs – not just companies – were responsible for the creation of new things in the search of profit. Knight focused on entrepreneurs as the bearers of uncertainty and believed they were responsible for risk premiums in financial markets. Kirzner thought of entrepreneurship as a process that led to the discovery.
^ Laureiro-Martínez, Daniella; Canessa, Nicola; Brusoni, Stefano; Zollo, Maurizio; Hare, Todd; Alemanno, Federica; Cappa, Stefano F. (22 January 2014). "Frontopolar cortex and decision-making efficiency: comparing brain activity of experts with different professional background during an exploration-exploitation task". Frontiers in Human Neuroscience. 7: 927. doi:10.3389/fnhum.2013.00927. PMC 3897871. PMID 24478664.
Many small businesses don't have room in their budgets to hire a full-time IT employee, so when their systems go on the fritz, they'll usually call a computer-savvy friend or family member. If you are tech savvy and have experience working on computers and networks, you can eliminate their need to call in a favor by offering immediate remote technical assistance.
"Being a successful entrepreneur also means being a good leader. Leadership is the ability to bring people to a place where they want to follow you, not feel like they are forced to follow you. This takes investing in your team personally. They must know you're not only going to hold them accountable and drive them to be better, but [you will] also look out for them when they are struggling. It's not transactional, it's a relationship." – Steve Schwab, founder and CEO of Casago
Just Jewelry’s items range from $12 – $28, making it accessible to more people. To start selling as a Just Jewelry consultant, you must buy a $99 starter kit, valued at $241. With this kit, you receive a sample of their jewelry and a business kit. From the start, new consultants receive 30% discount on their jewelry collection and 10% discount on their boutique. Once you purchase $300 in jewelry and boutique, you start to receive a 50% discount on all jewelry purchases and 30% off boutique items. Another way to receive the bigger percentage immediately is to purchase the $399 starter kit, valued at $749. Included in this is $650 worth of jewelry, business kit, and a website and email account.
When one of your customers makes a purchase, you purchase the product from a third-party company (the drop shipper, usually a manufacturer or wholesaler) for a lower price. This process is as simple as forwarding the order from your customer, a process that can actually be completely automated. (Remember you don't have any risk here of buying inventory because the sale has already been made).
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